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Friday December 02, 2016
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WSCC Cornerstone Notes remind us of the mission that was launched in 2014 with the first Cornerstone Catholic Conference: "to inspire and educate Catholics and others to continue working together to protect human life:  the unborn, individuals who live in poverty or on the margins of society, and people at the end of life."
December 1, 2016           
 
 IN THIS ISSUE (CLICK "READ MORE" BELOW)
  • • Who Is My Neighbor?: The Face of Poverty in Washington State
  • • Dec. 12: Day of Prayer and Solidarity with Families of Immigrants
  • • Events Marking Roe v. Wade Anniversary
  • • 9 Days for Life
  • • Conclusion of the Jubilee Year of Mercy
  • • On the World Day of Peace, Reflect on Nonviolence with Pope Francis
     
 
 
After spending the past year listening to people from across our state who live in poverty, the Bishops of Washington State released a pastoral letter on poverty entitled "Who Is My Neighbor?: The Face of Poverty in Washington State."   As the Bishops say in the letter, the suffering associated with poverty has become epidemic in every city, town and community in our state. The Bishops ask you to read and reflect on the letter.
 
In order to mobilize Catholics in Washington to pray and act in solidarity with those who lack the necessities of life, the Bishops also prepared a video and a study guide for use by parishes that are available on the WSCC website.  
 
The Bishops encourage parishioners to engage in reflection on the pastoral letter during Lent 2017, so that the Catholic community in Washington State may discern how to live out our call to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, shelter the homeless and care for those suffering from physical and mental illness. The video and study guide will help lead parish discussions to answer the question: "Who is my neighbor?" and will assist in identifying "the Faces of Poverty" in each community.
 

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The USCCB has designated December 12, 2016, the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, as a Day of Prayer with a focus on the plight of refugees and migrants.  "As Christmas approaches and especially on this feast of Our Lady, we are reminded of how our savior Jesus Christ was not born in the comfort of his own home, but rather in an unfamiliar manger," said Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, archbishop of Galveston-Houston and president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). "To all those families separated and far from home in uncertain times, we join with you in a prayer for comfort and joy this Advent season," Cardinal DiNardo added.
 
"So many families are wondering how changes to immigration policy might impact them," said Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, vice-president of the USCCB. "We want them to know the Church is with them, offers prayers on their behalf, and is actively monitoring developments at the diocesan, state, and national levels to be an effective advocate on their behalf."

Prayer services and special Masses will be held in many dioceses across the country as the Catholic Church continues to accompany migrants and refugees seeking an opportunity to provide for their families. If you are unable to attend or there is not one near you, Catholics are invited to offer prayers wherever they may be.  For example, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' office of Migrant and Refugee Services (MRS) has also developed a Scriptural Rosary entitled "Unity in Diversity" that includes prayers for migrants and refugees. 
 
In the coming days, the USCCB will be developing additional pastoral resources, reflecting the active collaboration of various USCCB Committees whose mandates touch on the concerns of migrants and refugees.  These efforts will continue to follow the basic principles contained in Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope, the 2003 pastoral letter issued jointly by the bishops of the United States and Mexico. A pamphlet introducing and summarizing this document is available in both English and Spanish.

 

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There will be events in both Western and Eastern Washington to mark the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion throughout the country. For more about Roe v. Wade and the companion decision, Doe v. Bolton, please refer to the EndRoe.org website.
 
Western Washington - Monday, January 23: The Archdiocese of Seattle sponsors the annual Mass for Life which will begin at 9:30 am at Marcus Pavilion, Saint Martin's University, Lacey. Due to limited parking, all are encouraged to use buses or carpool. Driving directions to campus and parking instructions are available online. For parking and other questions: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. To download a copy of the Mass for Life flyer, click here. The annual Washington March for Life will begin at noon on the north steps of the State Capitol in Olympia. People are encouraged to visit their legislators after the March. For more information on the March for Life, click here.
Eastern Washington - Saturday, January 28: Bishop Thomas Daly, Bishop of Spokane, will celebrate a Mass for life at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Lourdes, at 9:30 am. Following the Mass, there will be a gathering at Spokane's Riverfront Park at 11:00 am, for the second annual Walk for Life Northwest. For more information about the Walk, refer to the Walk for Life Northwest website.
 

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Join thousands of Catholics across the country in prayer during the bishops' pro-life novena, 9 Days for Life, from Saturday, January 16 - Sunday, January 24. Participate through email, text message, Facebook, or a free iOS or Android app! Click here for resources to help promote this effort and invite others to join in.
 
 

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To mark the end of the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy, Pope Francis issued an apostolic letter titled Misericordia et Misera. The following are a few excerpts to reflect on during Advent:
 
"Mercy is always a gratuitous act of our heavenly Father, an unconditional and unmerited act of love. ... Now, at the conclusion of this Jubilee, it is time to look to the future and to understand how best to continue, with joy, fidelity and enthusiasm, experiencing the richness of divine mercy.
 
 "The culture of extreme individualism, especially in the West, has led to a loss of a sense of solidarity with and responsibility for others. Today many people have no experience of God himself, and this represents the greatest poverty and the major obstacle to recognizing the inviolable dignity of human life.
 
"This is the time of mercy. Each day of our journey is marked by God's presence. He guides our steps with the power of the grace that the Spirit pours into our hearts to make them capable of loving. It is the time of mercy for each and all, since no one can think that he or she is cut off from God's closeness and the power of his tender love. It is the time of mercy because those who are weak and vulnerable, distant and alone, ought to feel the presence of brothers and sisters who can help them in their need. It is the time of mercy because the poor should feel that they are regarded with respect and concern by others who have overcome indifference and discovered what is essential in life. It is the time of mercy because no sinner can ever tire of asking forgiveness and all can feel the welcoming embrace of the Father."
 
In his apostolic letter, the Pope also expanded the faculty to forgive the sin of abortion to all priests: "...I henceforth grant to all priests, in virtue of their ministry, the faculty to absolve those who have committed the sin of procured abortion. ... I wish to restate as firmly as I can that abortion is a grave sin, since it puts an end to an innocent life. In the same way, however, I can and must state that there is no sin that God's mercy cannot reach and wipe away when it finds a repentant heart seeking to be reconciled with the Father."
 
To read the entire apostolic letter, visit the Vatican website.
 
 
Notice:  The next issue of Cornerstone Notes will be in January.
 
 
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The Washington State Catholic Conference (WSCC) is the public policy voice of the Catholic Bishops of Washington State.

 

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In his Message for the 50th World Day of Peace (January 1, 2017), titled "Non-Violence: A Style of Politics for Peace," Pope Francis will urge families, faith communities, government leaders, and the international community to practice nonviolence and work to build a just peace. Gospel nonviolence is not passive; it entails active strategies such as peacebuilding, conflict transformation, restorative justice, and unarmed civilian protection. Seeking a just peace means preventing conflict by addressing its causes, building relationships, and facilitating healing and restoration. The USCCB has prepared a two-page handout in English and Spanish that provides background information for the message, and prayer and action ideas. To download the Holy Father's statement (which will likely be posted in late December) visit the Vatican website.

Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe to be a

Day of Prayer and Solidarity with Families of Immigrants

(haz clic aqui para leer en español)

 
WASHINGTON – A Day of Prayer with a focus on the plight of refugees and migrants will take place across the United States on December 12, 2016, the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe.  It will be a time to place before a merciful God the hopes, fears, and needs of all those families who have come to the U.S. seeking a better life. 
 
“As Christmas approaches and especially on this feast of Our Lady, we are reminded of how our savior Jesus Christ was not born in the comfort of his own home, but rather in an unfamiliar manger,” said Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, archbishop of Galveston-Houston and president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). “To all those families separated and far from home in uncertain times, we join with you in a prayer for comfort and joy this Advent season,” Cardinal DiNardo added.
 
Prayer services and special Masses will be held in many dioceses across the country as the Catholic Church continues to accompany migrants and refugees seeking an opportunity to provide for their families. If you are unable to attend or there is not one near you, Catholics are invited to offer prayers wherever they may be.  For example, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ office of Migrant and Refugee Services (MRS) has also developed a Scriptural Rosary entitled “Unity in Diversity” that includes prayers for migrants and refugees. Click here
 
“So many families are wondering how changes to immigration policy might impact them,” said Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, vice-president of the USCCB. “We want them to know the Church is with them, offers prayers on their behalf, and is actively monitoring developments at the diocesan, state, and national levels to be an effective advocate on their behalf.”
 
In the coming days, the USCCB will be developing additional pastoral resources, reflecting the active collaboration of various USCCB Committees whose mandates touch on the concerns of migrants and refugees.  These efforts will continue to follow the basic principles contained in Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope, the 2003 pastoral letter issued jointly by the bishops of the United States and Mexico. A pamphlet introducing and summarizing this document is available in both English (Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope) and Spanish (Juntos en el Camino de la Esperanza).

Thursday, December 8, is the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which is the patronal feast of the United States and a holy day of obligation. In view of the great devotion many of our people have for Our Lady of Guadalupe, Bishop Joseph Tyson is dispensing the obligation to attend Mass December 8 for those who attend a Guadalupe Mass on Monday, December 12. As is already the case, Catholics who are unable to attend Mass on a holy day of obligation may seek a dispensation from a priest or deacon of the Diocese, who can either excuse the person from the obligation completely, or commute it to another pious work, such as praying the Rosary.

Martes, el 8 de diciembre, es la Solemnidad de la Inmaculada Concepción de la Santísima Virgen María, que es la fiesta patronal de los Estados Unidos y un día de precepto. En vista de la gran devoción que mucha de nuestra gente tiene para Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, el Obispo Joseph Tyson está dispensando de la obligación de asistir a misa en el 8 de diciembre para los que asisten a una Misa Guadalupana en lunes, el 12 de diciembre. Como ya es el caso, los católicos que no pueden asistir a la Misa en un día de precepto pueden pedir de un sacerdote o diácono de la Diócesis por una dispensa. El sacerdote o diácono puede dispensar a la persona de la obligación por completo, o conmutarla a otra obra piadosa, como rezar el Rosario.

November 18, 2016  
 Inside this issue (scroll down to read articles)
 
  • • "Who is My Neighbor?" - Bishops Release New Pastoral Letter
  • • Poverty Awareness Month (January) Materials Available Now
  • • General Election Results
  • • Coming Together as Faithful Citizens for the Common Good
  • • All Americans Urged to Work Together to Welcome Refugees and Immigrants
  • • Pope's Intention for November: Refugees
  • • Faithful Action on Climate Change: New Training Program
  • • Special Note for 2017 Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children
     
 

The Bishops of Washington State have issued a pastoral letter, Who Is My Neighbor - The Face of Poverty in Washington State, that examines and reflects on poverty in Washington State. The document is the fruit of a series of listening sessions which the Bishops held throughout the state over the past year. The Bishops listened to people living in poverty, and experienced the words of Pope Francis, they "have much to teach us."
 
"In our listening sessions, we heard 'the cry of poor' (Psalm 34). ... Reflecting on what we heard, we recognize the urgent need for action to alleviate the suffering that has become epidemic in every city, town and community in our state. ... Our listening sessions convinced us that the plight of those living in poverty in our state is reaching crisis proportions. At the same time, we grew in awareness that providing just a little help can make a big difference."
 
In addition to the English version, the 3-page pastoral letter will be available in Spanish and Vietnamese. In the coming weeks, the Bishops are releasing a study guide and a video "to help our Catholic people and parishes confront the poverty in our state and explore ways we can act as a community of faith to alleviate suffering and advocate for change." The Bishops' statement can be found on the WSCC website.

 

     
  Take up Pope Francis' challenge to go the peripheries by participating in Poverty Awareness Month in January.  An online and print calendar (also en Español) includes daily ways to learn about poverty, get inspired by how communities are responding, and take action with others.  In addition to the calendar, there are longer daily reflections (also en Español). You can also sign up to receive the daily reflections by email.  Share these materials with Catholics in your parish and follow the action on Facebook and Twitter.  

     
 
 
Voters in Washington State approved four initiatives including ones that will raise the minimum wage and enable courts to temporarily prevent access to firearms. The voters rejected measures that would have reformed campaign finance and taxed carbon emissions. For all the details on the results of the General Election in Washington State, see the Washington Secretary of State's website.
 

     
 
 
Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), issued a statement on November 9 regarding the election of Donald Trump as President-Elect - some excerpts:
 
"The American people have made their decision on the next President of the United States, members of Congress as well as state and local officials. I congratulate Mr. Trump and everyone elected yesterday.  Now is the moment to move toward the responsibility of governing for the common good of all citizens. Let us not see each other in the divisive light of Democrat or Republican or any other political party, but rather, let us see the face of Christ in our neighbors, especially the suffering or those with whom we may disagree.
 
"We, as citizens and our elected representatives, would do well to remember the words of Pope Francis when he addressed the United States Congress last year, "all political activity must serve and promote the good of the human person and be based on respect for his or her dignity." ...
 
"The Bishops' Conference looks forward to working with President-elect Trump to protect human life from its most vulnerable beginning to its natural end. We will advocate for policies that offer opportunity to all people, of all faiths, in all walks of life. We are firm in our resolve that our brothers and sisters who are migrants and refugees can be humanely welcomed without sacrificing our security. ..."
 
To read the entire statement, visit the USCCB website.
 

     
 
 
On November 11, Bishop Eusebio Elizondo, auxiliary bishop of Seattle, and chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' (USCCB) Committee on Migration, issued a statement congratulating President-elect Donald Trump on his election and emphasized the need to continue to protect the inherent dignity of refugees and migrants. Here are a few excerpts:
 
"We would first like to congratulate President-elect Donald J. Trump and give our support for all efforts to work together to promote the common good, especially those to protect the most vulnerable among us. I personally pledge my prayers for Mr. Trump, all elected officials, and those who will work in the new administration. I offer a special word to migrant and refugee families living in the United States: be assured of our solidarity and continued accompaniment as you work for a better life. ...
 
"Serving and welcoming people fleeing violence and conflict in various regions of the world is part of our identity as Catholics. The Church will continue this life-saving tradition. Today, with more than 65 million people forcibly displaced from their homes, the need to welcome refugees and provide freedom from persecution is more acute than ever and 80 of our dioceses across the country are eager to continue this wonderful act of accompaniment born of our Christian faith. We stand ready to work with a new administration to continue to ensure that refugees are humanely welcomed without sacrificing our security or our core values as Americans. A duty to welcome and protect newcomers, particularly refugees, is an integral part of our mission to help our neighbors in need. ..."
 
At their meeting this week in Baltimore, the U.S. Bishops voted to fully endorse Bishop Elizondo's statement. To read the complete text, visit the USCCB website.
 

     
 
 
Pope Francis' prayer intention for November is "That the countries which take in a great number of displaced persons and refugees may find support for their efforts which show solidarity." To see this month's video, click here.
 

     
 

There is a brand new pastoral training program titled, "Laudato Si' in the Parish: Preaching and Pastoral Strategies." It is a joint project of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) and Catholic Climate Covenant (CCC). Designed to help equip priests and deacons respond to Pope Francis's encyclical on ecology in their role as pastors, the training includes:
  • Presentations on the Church's teaching on ecology.
  • How to use Laudato Si' to inspire homilies.
  • An overview of resources that CCC and USCCB offer to priests and parishes to help them implement the message of Laudato Si'.
  • Time for conversation and reflection on local environmental concerns.
The program, still in its "pilot" stage, launched in October with trainings in Des Moines, Iowa and Las Cruces, NM. Two other trainings are scheduled for December in the dioceses of San Diego and Atlanta. If you are interested in bringing the Pastoral Training Program to your diocese, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can learn more about the Pastoral Training Program on the CCC blog.
 


     
   


The Catholic Bishops have designated January 22, the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, as national day of prayer for the legal protection of unborn children.  Since January 22, 2017 falls on a Sunday, the designated observance will be on Monday, January 23. For more information and resources for this observance, please visit the USCCB webpage.
 
 
 
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The Washington State Catholic Conference (WSCC) is the public policy voice of the Catholic Bishops of Washington State.

Catholic Bishops to state: ‘Poverty has a face’

 


The Catholic bishops of Washington State November 17 released a letter expressing their concern that poverty is reaching “crisis proportions” and called on all people to take direct action with those who are homeless, mentally ill, addicted and hungry.

The pastoral letter is a formal declaration by the bishops that recognizing and taking action to address poverty are moral issues and priorities for Catholics and all people of good faith. (Click to read in Spanish)

The bishops – Bishop Joseph Tyson of Yakima, Archbishop J. Peter Sartain and Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo of Seattle, and Bishop Thomas Daly of Spokane – met with people from around the state who shared their experiences of poverty in listening sessions held over the past year. “We heard in the voices of people who are poor both a plea for mercy and a desire to participate fully in the life of their communities,” they write.

In their letter, the bishops invite those who enjoy the material necessities of life to “stop and look into the face of poverty” and “recognize that ‘the poor’ are not strangers. They are our sisters and brothers, members of our human family.”

The pastoral letter, entitled “Who Is My Neighbor? The Face of Poverty in Washington State” emphasizes the “the urgent need for action.”  The letter urges Catholic people and parishes, government and public officials to “take direct action that demonstrates concern for our sisters and brothers.”

 “Some things are best addressed by individuals, families, churches and charities; but when problems such as homelessness, hunger, drug addiction and mental illness are common to every community, it is a just and reasonable expectation that society will act cooperatively to address these problems,” the bishops write.

“It is not our intention to prescribe specific policy options,” they add, “but to propose a moral basis for determining whether public policies serve justice (i.e., whether public policies serve people).”

The letter urges Catholics to advocate “on behalf of those who lack the basic rights of food and shelter, access to health care, a living wage and education” and to ask difficult questions and search for solutions.

To access a Study Guide in English for the Pastoral Letter, click here

For a form to order bound copies of the Study Guide, click here

October 13, 2016    
 
 
  • • WSCC Launches New Website
  • • Importance of Civil Dialogue
  • • Congress Approves Funding before Recessing
  • • American Catholics Respond to Hurricane Matthew
  • • October 16 Marks World Food Day
  • • California Seeks to Abolish Death Penalty
  • • Cornerstone Volunteers Needed
     
  We have a new website! It has all of the essential resources as the old (statements by Washington's Bishops, etc.) but with a new design that is optimized for mobile devices. On the website you will also find "WSCC Guidance  on Forming Consciences  & Voting Decisions."  

     
 
 
The following is an excerpt from a recent post on To Go Forth (a blog from USCCB's Department of Justice, Peace & Human Development):

"When inflammatory rhetoric, uncivil accusations, and personal attacks abound, the temptation can be to turn off the news, shut the newspaper, and ignore the Twitter feed for the next four weeks. ... We must allow the Holy Spirit to guide us so that we may model love and mercy in our families, at our workplaces, and in the public square. We must also urge candidates and elected officials to engage in dialogue that is civil and respectful.

"Civil dialogue means that when speaking with others with whom we disagree:
  • We should begin with respect.
  • We should decide neither to degrade the persons, characters, and reputations of others who hold different positions from our own, nor spread rumors, falsehoods, or half truths about them.
  • We should be careful about language we use, avoiding inflammatory words and rhetoric.
  • We should not assign motives to others. Instead, we should assume that our family members, friends, and colleagues are speaking in good faith, even if we disagree with them.
  • We should listen carefully and respectfully to other people.
  • We should remember that we are members of a community, and we should try to strengthen our sense of community through the love and care we show one another.
  • We should be people who express our thoughts, opinions, and positions-but always in love and truth.
"As an individual and as a family, reflect on Pope Francis' guidelines on dialogue and consider how you can put them into practice in your own conversations.

"Encourage civil dialogue in your parish. Include the civil dialogue insert in your bulletins in English and Spanish."

Your parish may wish to show the video reflections by Cardinal Wuerl and byFranciscan Media on civil dialogue.
 

     
  Last month Congress passed a Continuing Resolution which will fund the government through December 9th plus provide a full year of appropriations for Military Construction, Veterans Affairs and related programs.  The bill also included an additional $1.1 billion to prevent the spread of the Zika virus, $500 million in grants to help states recover from recent floods and $37 million to fight the opioid epidemic. As part of the deal, an agreement was reached to include funds to deal with the lead contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan, in the Water Resources Development Act bill - although complete details will need to resolved when Congress returns after the election. Congress is now on recess until November 14th.  When the members return, Congress will have only twenty days during the lame-duck session to finalize government appropriations for the year and pass legislation before the end of the congressional year.  

     
 
 
With communications cut in many areas, and bridges and roads destroyed, preventing access to the hardest hit communities (especially in Haiti), the full extent of the damage from Hurricane Matthew is still emerging. Catholic Relief Services (CRS) has made an initial commitment of $5 million to provide the most vulnerable with critical supplies, like food, water and shelter. In addition to accepting your donations, the CRS website offers prayers and intercessions specific to Hurricane Matthew for use with your families and parishes. Catholic Charities USA is also responding to aid people in the southeastern U.S. states hit by Matthew.
 

     
 
Join Pope Francis in celebrating World Food Day on Oct. 16.  His 2016 message will be posted here. As you celebrate this day and reflect on what faith-inspired action you may be called to take, here are 7 Ways to be a Good Steward of the Harvest from our friends at Catholic Relief Services.

You can also take action with the U.S. Catholic Bishops and CRS through Catholics Confront Global Poverty by participating in this action alert to fight global hunger.

 

     
  On November 8, voters in California will vote on an initiative that would abolish the death penalty in that state. The California Catholic Conference and theCatholic Mobilizing Network have produced a riveting video that portrays four Catholics who share why they oppose the death penalty. The Catholics include a former warden at San Quentin prison and two people whose loved ones were murdered. This video brings to life a simple yet profound message: the Catholic Church opposes the death penalty and works for the end of capital punishment. Over 100,000 people have already watched this video! In the coming weeks and months, thousands more will hear this unambiguous message of life and mercy from our Church. Help spread the message far and wide that the death penalty is not needed in society.  

     
 

The next statewide Cornerstone Catholic Conference is planned for Tacoma next October in 2017. In the coming weeks, WSCC will hold meetings in Seattle (Oct. 27) and Tacoma (Nov. 15) with prospective volunteers - if you would like to help, please contact Jim Thomas at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 206-301-0556.

Regretfully, the Diocese of Spokane had to cancel the 2016 regional Cornerstone that had been planned for October 22.
 
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The Washington State Catholic Conference (WSCC) is the public policy voice of the Catholic Bishops of Washington State.

 

Moved by Mercy

Cardinal Dolan Launches 2016-17 Program
with Respect Life Month Statement

 

Respect Life Program theme for 2016-17: “Moved by Mercy”

“Everyone should be cherished and protected!”

WASHINGTON—In a statement to mark Respect Life Month, October 2016, Timothy Cardinal Dolan of New York called for all human life to be “cherished and protected.” Cardinal Dolan chairs the Committee on Pro-Life Activities of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB).
 
The Cardinal’s statement launches the year-long Respect Life Program (www.usccb.org/respectlife), which explores the theme, “Moved by Mercy.” As Pope Francis said in calling for the Jubilee Year of Mercy, “We are called to show mercy because mercy has first been shown to us.” CardinalDolan said: “When we let our hearts be moved by God’s mercy, it shapes everything.”
 
Cardinal Dolan emphasized the need to protect human life at every stage. “From each tiny child waiting to be born, to individuals nearing death, all are precious and deserve our care and protection.”
 
“Women and men suffering after abortion, individuals tempted to end their lives, couples longing to conceive a child, people pushed to the margins of society by a ‘throwaway culture’, expectant mothers facing challenging pregnancies, and every other person—each ‘has a place in God’s heart from all eternity’,” he said, citing the 2016 apostolic exhortation, Amoris Laetitia (The Joy of Love). Cardinal Dolan called for every person to be “treated with the dignity they deserve. No one should ever be treated callously or carelessly – everyone should be cherished and protected!”
 
Begun in 1972, the Respect Life Program highlights the value and dignity of human life throughout the year. It is observed in Catholic dioceses throughout the United States. Tools equip leaders across the spectrum of Catholic work, ministry, and education to integrate the message of mercy on life issues.
 
The 2016-17 Respect Life Program features six articles highlighting ways to put mercy into action. They address the tragedy of assisted suicide, navigating infertility, facilitating healing after abortion, end of life care, attentiveness to God’s creation, and supporting birthmothers. This year’s program offers new prayers, toolkits for clergysocial media, and press, and other resources for parish bulletins, religious education, RCIA, marriage prep, and Catholic high schools.
 
The full text of Cardinal Dolan’s statement is available here as an attachment (English / Spanish), along with many other resources at www.usccb.org/respectlife.

Magnificat Classes English and Spanish Resume October 22

 

Magnificat Classes resume October 22 at Holy Spirit Parish in Kennewick.  Click on the attachments to view the full calendar of sessions (English and Spanish), or to download promotional posters (English and Spanish) and brochures (English and Spanish).

To kick off the English-language series at Holy Spirit Parish October 22, Father Daniel Steele will speak on “Sacraments”; Father Michael Brzezowski will discuss “Truth of Faith, Dogma”; and Steve Wilmes will talk about “Social Doctrine of the Church.” At this same site, on November 12, Father Jacob Davis will discuss “The Bible”; Father Peter Steele will cover “Apologetics & Ecumenism”; and Father Ricardo Villarreal will speak on “Mission of the Church.”

At St. Pius X Church in Quincy October 29, Father Daniel Steele will discuss “Sacraments”; Father Michael Brzezowski, “Truth of Faith, Dogma”; and Steve Wilmes, “Social Doctrine of the Church.” Then, on November 19, Bishop Joseph Tyson will speak on “The Bible”; Father Peter Steele on “Apologetics & Ecumenism”; and Father Ricardo Villarreal on “Mission of the Church.”

At St. Paul Cathedral School, 1214 W. Chestnut in Yakima, classes will begin November 5, with Father Daniel Steele talking about “Sacraments”; Father Michael Brzezowski, “Truth of Faith, Dogma”; and Steve Wilmes, “Social Doctrine of the Church.” On December 3, Bishop Joseph Tyson will discuss “The Bible”; Father Peter Steele, “Apologetics & Ecumenism”; and Father Ricardo Villarreal, “Mission of the Church.”

***

Para dar inicio a la serie en idioma inglés, en la Parroquia Holy Spirit, el 22 de octubre, el Padre Jaime Chacónhablará sobre los “Sacramentos”; la Hermana María Isabel Doñate hablará sobre “Espiritualidad”; y la Hermana Irma Lerma hablará sobre “Catequesis.” En el mismo lugar, el 12 de noviembre, el Padre Jaime Chacón hablará sobre “La Biblia”; laHermana Blanca Estela Gamboa cubrirá “Verdades de Fe, Dogma”; y la Hermana Olga Cano hablará sobre la "Doctrina Social de la Iglesia."

En la Iglesia St. Pius X, el 29 de octubre, el Padre Jaime Chacón hablará sobre los “Sacramentos”; la Hermana María Isabel Doñate hablará sobre “Espiritualidad”; y la Hermana Irma Lerma hablará sobre “Catequesis.” Luego, el 19 de Noviembre,  el Padre Jaime Chacón hablará sobre “La Biblia”; laHermana Blanca Estela Gamboa cubrirá “Verdades de Fe, Dogma”; y la Hermana Olga Cano hablará sobre la "Doctrina Social de la Iglesia.

En St. Paul Cathedral School, 1214 W. Chestnut en Yakima, las clases comenzarán el 5 de Noviembre.El Padre Jaime Chacón hablará sobre los “Sacramentos”; la Hermana María Isabel Doñate hablará sobre “Espiritualidad”; y la Hermana Irma Lerma hablará sobre “Catequesis.” El 3 de Diciembre, el Padre Jaime Chacón hablará sobre “La Biblia”; laHermana Blanca Estela Gamboa cubrirá “Verdades de Fe, Dogma”; y la Hermana Olga Cano hablará sobre la "Doctrina Social de la Iglesia."

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If you have any questions please contact the Pastoral Center, 509-965-7117.

Image: Saint Augustine, cruzblanca.org. 

Upcoming Events

December 2-3, 2016

Abortion Healing Conference 
(Red Lion Hotel, Wenatchee)

December 3, 2016

Magnificat Classes Continue 
(St. Paul Cathedral School, Yakima)

December 8, 2016

Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception

Day of Obligation Transferable

December 12, 2016

Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

Day of Prayer and Solidarity

bishop tyson-small

Most Rev. Joseph J. Tyson
Bishop of Yakima

Bishop's Homilies & Statements
Biography

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Fathers,

Earlier this evening in Rome I received the following request for prayers from Joan Rosenhauer, executive vice president of U.S. Operations for Catholic Relief Services.  Your prayers, and those of all the faithful in the diocese, will be most appreciated.  I have attached a prayer service and petitions provided by CRS.  I would also encourage you to consider offering a daily Mass in the near future, using the readings of the day, “For the Preservation of Peace and Justice” (no. 30 of the Masses and Prayers for Various Needs and Occasions).  Here is Ms. Rosenhauer's message:

Dear CRS Partners:

Your prayers are needed for peace in Sudan and South Sudan!

Southern Sudan became the world’s newest nation after a referendum that was, against all odds, peaceful and orderly. It is a testimony to the power of prayer and the will of people who insisted that a peaceful future is possible for this war-torn region. You were among them. Your prayer, your advocacy and your support for peacebuilding efforts in Sudan were an essential part of the global effort that worked.

But the hope and progress could be erased if the outstanding issues between Sudan and South Sudan are not settled. Escalating violence is threatening the future of South Sudan and ongoing conflict in Darfur, as well as along the border of Sudan and South Sudan--in Abyei, the Nuba Mountains, and Blue Nile--is jeopardizing stability for all of the Sudanese people.  We are asking again for your prayers for all the people of Sudan.

We offer you a brief prayer and intercessions, along with a prayer service for the Sudanese people.  

Thank you for everything you do for our brothers and sisters around the world and your continued prayers for the people of Sudan and South Sudan.

Peace & Blessings,
Joan Rosenhauer